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Licensing Guides

Nevada Electrical License: How to Become a Licensed Electrician in Nevada

category-iconElectrical, NV

Table of Contents
  1. Electrical Contractor Licensing Requirements for Nevada

  2. Steps to Get an Electrician License in Nevada

  3. Types of Electrical Licensure in Nevada

  4. Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Contractor in Nevada

  5. How Much Does It Cost to Get an Electrical Contractors License in Nevada?

  6. How Long Does it Take to Get an Electrical Contracting License in Nevada?

  7. Nevada Electrician Programs and Schools

  8. Nevada Electrical Contractor Licensing Trade Examination Details

  9. Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Nevada?

  10. Does My Nevada Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

Being an electrician isn’t just a job, it’s a solid career path. Electrical contractors enjoy a wide range of employment opportunities and earn a respectable income. There’s also job security—customers will always need skilled trade professionals to install and service electrical systems in their homes and businesses. 

The process of becoming an electrician takes time, but you get paid while you learn and gain experience! 

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Electrical Contractor Licensing Requirements for Nevada

Is a license required for electricians in Nevada? Yes.

To perform electrical work in the state of Nevada, you must be a licensed contractor, or working under a licensed electrician. Each district has its own license requirements, and is managed differently by county and city. Electricians must comply with the conditions pertaining to the place they intend to work. 

Steps to Get an Electrician License in Nevada

  1. Hold some form of U.S. Identification and be at least 18 years of age

  2. Acquire three to four years of experience and instruction necessary to obtain an electrical journeyman card through the local licensing board

  3. Attain certification as a Residential Journeyman electrician or General Journeyman

  4. Apply for Electrical Contractors License after four years of experience as a journeyman, foreman, or supervising employee

OBTAIN NECESSARY HOURS OF EXPERIENCE: Experience must be under the supervision of a licensed electrical contractor. Due to the local/county level licensing of individual electricians, conditions may vary in procuring a journeyman electrician card. Generally, in the state of Nevada, electrical training is gained through apprenticeship programs or trade schools. You must have 3,000 to 4,000 hours of experience before applying for your journeyman certification.

APPLY TO BE A JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN: Take an exam issued by the International Code Council in the county or city you plan to operate in. The test covers the National Electrical Code (NEC). Journeyman certification remains valid for three years in the state of Nevada, and renewal costs $30. In addition, you will be required to produce evidence of Continuing Education Units (CEU) instruction related to the electrical trade. 

APPLY FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR LICENSE: After fulfilling the four-year work experience requirement at the journeyman level, candidates may apply for a Nevada Electrical Contractors License through the Nevada State Contractors Board (NSCB). Applications may be sent to one of two offices: 2310 Corporate Circle, Suite 200, Henderson, NV, 89074, or 9670 Gateway Drive, Suite 100, Reno, NV, 89521. License application includes work experience documentation, educational record, and a financial statement. You must also pay a $300 nonrefundable application processing fee. 

TAKE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR LICENSING EXAM: First-time applicants are required to take an exam through PSI Licensure. The test, which is split into two parts and costs $140, covers the National Electrical Code (NEC), and Business Management and Construction. You get three attempts to pass the exam. If you do not pass the exam after three tries, you may apply again in thirty days.

FINAL STEPS TO ACTIVATE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS LICENSE: Once your application gets approved and you successfully complete the exam, there is a biennial (two-year) license fee of $600 to activate licensure. The application approval letter will indicate the amount you’re expected to secure for a license bond. Applicants must also provide proof of Industrial Insurance. Finally, candidates must register with the Residential Recovery Fund and pay an assessment, which scales fees based on the work monetary limit of the license holder, or fill out an exemption certificate if you won’t be working on any residential properties.

Types of Electrical Licensure in Nevada

What are the different types of electrician licensing in Nevada? 

There are two different types of electrical licenses in Nevada: an electrical journeyman license and an electrical contractor license. Some jurisdictions, such as Reno, offer residential journeyman certification, which requires about 2,000 fewer hours of documented experience than a general journeyman card. Clark County (Las Vegas) provides the choice to go a step further and become certified as a master electrician, for those already certified as a journeyman.

Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Contractor in Nevada

There are many benefits you’ll see from getting a Nevada Electrician license:

  • Most importantly, it is required by law in Nevada to be licensed through the Nevada State Contractors Board to legally perform electrical work.

  • There is a high demand for licensed electricians in Nevada. The U.S. Department of Labor predicted a 47.1% increase in electricians between 2014 and 2024.

  • A trade license provides proof of your experience and skill.

  • Only licensed electricians have the eligibility to work independently as an electrical contractor, operate a business and advertise services, obtain commercial insurance and bonding, pull electrical permits and pass inspections, bid on public and government projects.

  • Obtaining a license protects your company and your customers.

  • A license gives you a competitive advantage in the job market.

  • It also increases your earning potential as an electrician.

How Much Does It Cost to Get an Electrical Contractors License in Nevada?

The cost of an electrical contractor’s license in Nevada varies, due to the variation in bond fees and amount owed (if any) for residential recovery funds. Electricians can expect to pay a total of around $1,000 in application, testing, and license activation fees.

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How Long Does it Take to Get an Electrical Contracting License in Nevada?

It will take a minimum of three years to become a licensed journeyman electrician in Nevada. Most of Nevada’s electrical programs require 8,000 hours of on-the-job training and classroom instruction. The state of Nevada requires completion of four years experience as a journeyman, foreman, or supervising employee to apply for an Electrical Contractors License.  

Nevada Electrician Programs and Schools 

There are many programs to get the training you need to become an electrician in Nevada, located all over the state, in cities like Las Vegas and Reno to smaller communities like Elko. 

Trade Schools

  • College of Southern Nevada (Las Vegas, NV): Tuition costs about $20,000 per semester for full-time enrollment.

  • Great Basin College (Elko, NV): Tuition costs around $10,000 per year for full-time enrollment.

  • Truckee Meadows Community College (Reno, NV): The tuition costs approximately $10,000 per semester for full-time enrollment.

Trade School Prerequisites: You must reside in the state of Nevada, hold a valid driver’s license, be at least 18 years of age, and graduate high school or possess a GED.

Electrician Apprenticeship Organizations

  • Electrical JATC for Southern Nevada (Las Vegas, NV)

  • Northern Nevada Electrical JATC (Reno, NV)

  • National Electrical Contractors Association

  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)

  • Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc., Nevada Chapter

Apprenticeship Program Prerequisites: You must be at least 18 years old, hold a valid driver’s license, and have a high school diploma or a GED. You are required to pass a drug screening. 

Nevada Electrical Contractor Licensing Trade Examination Details

You are required to pass a two-part electrical exam administered by PSI. You get three opportunities to successfully pass the open-book tests. The construction industry and business and law portion of the test contains 60 multiple-choice questions, and you must score at least 75%. The testing takes 120 minutes. 

The exam covers the following topics:

  • Licensing

  • Lien Laws

  • Labor Laws

  • Tax Laws

  • Construction Regulations

  • Environmental Safety and Health Department Regulations

  • Occupational Safety

  • Project Management

  • Financial Management

  • Risk Management

  • Contracts

  • Estimating and Bidding

The second part of the test covers the National Electrical Code (NEC). You must score a minimum of 42%. The trade exam must be completed within 2.5 hours. It features 60 multiple-choice questions over the topics listed below.

  • General Electrical Knowledge

  • Grounding and Bonding

  • Transmission Lines

  • Electrical Power

  • Service, Feeders and Branch Circuits

  • Overcurrent Protection

  • Low Voltage Lighting 

  • Illuminated Signs

  • Conductors and Cables

  • Motors

  • Raceways and Enclosures

  • Fire Detection and Alarm Systems

  • Special Occupancies and Equipment

  • Safety Information

Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Nevada?

The Nevada State Contractors Board (NSCB) grants electrician licenses.

Does My Nevada Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

Yes! Nevada maintains reciprocity agreements with Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Louisiana, North Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. The endorsing state must complete a Request for Verification of License form to verify the license.

National Electrician Certifications

While optional, national certifications can help you demonstrate your proficiency in certain aspects of the electrical trade to potential employers and clients, which often translates into more job opportunities and higher pay. 

These include the Independent Electrical Contractors’ Certified Professional Electrician (CPE) distinction, certification through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), among dozens of additional electrician certifications available.

Resources

You can stay up to date on all Electrician industry news in several ways: