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Licensing Guides

Nebraska Electrical License: How to Become a Licensed Electrician in Nebraska

category-iconElectrical, NE

Table of Contents
  1. Electrical Contractor Licensing Requirements for Nebraska

  2. Steps to Get an Electrician License in Nebraska

  3. Types of Electrician Licenses in Nebraska

  4. Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Electrician in Nebraska

  5. How Much Does It Cost for Electrician Licensing in Nebraska?

  6. How Long Does It Take to Get an Electrician License in Nebraska?

  7. Nebraska Electrician Training Programs and Schools

  8. Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Nebraska?

  9. Does My Nebraska Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

Being an electrician isn’t just a job, it’s a solid career path. Electrical contractors enjoy a wide range of employment opportunities and earn a respectable income. There’s also job security—customers will always need skilled trade professionals to install and service electrical systems in their homes and businesses. 

The process of becoming an electrician takes time, but you can get paid while you learn and gain experience!

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Electrical Contractor Licensing Requirements for Nebraska 

Is a license required for electricians in Nebraska? Yes. 

Most electrical work in the state of Nebraska requires a license. The Nebraska State Electrical Division regulates license requirements and issues master electrician licenses, journeyman electrician licenses, and electrical contractor licenses. Electrical apprentices must also register with the state.

Residents may install electrical wiring on their principal residence without a contractor license in the state of Nebraska, but not on a relative’s home, rental property, or recreational properties. All state properties require a licensed contractor to perform electrical work. 

In addition, an apprentice electrician must only conduct wiring work under the supervision of a licensed journeyman electrician. 

Steps to Get an Electrician License in Nebraska

  1. Gain necessary work experience and classroom-based training.

  2. Become a residential journeyman electrician or journeyman electrician.

  3. Obtain a master electrician license.

  4. Consider applying for your electrical contractor license. 

GAIN NECESSARY EXPERIENCE: A worker who registers with the Nebraska State Electrical Board and pays the required fees can work as an apprentice electrician, under the supervision of someone who holds one of the following seven state-level electrical contractor licenses: 

  • Class B Electrical Contractor

  • Electrical Contractor

  • Class B Journeyman Electrician

  • Journeyman Electrician

  • Residential Journeyman Electrician

  • Class A Master Electrician

  • Class B Master Electrician

An electrical apprentice must register and work in the trade for four years, consecutively. Note: A two-year electrical training course, or electrical experience gained while serving in the military, may count for one year of electrical apprentice work experience credit.

Journeyman: A journeyman electrician license requires at least four years of experience in the electrical trade, which includes work as an apprentice. Completion of a two-year post-high school electrical course can count for one year of experience. A journeyman electrician must also pass the respective state licensing exam.

For a residential journeyman electrician license, applicants need at least three years of experience in the electrical trade. Completion of a two-year post-high school electrical course can count for one year of experience. A residential journeyman electrician license is only valid for residential electrical installations. 

Electrical Contractor: To apply for an electrical contractor license, you must be a graduate of a four-year electrical course from an accredited college or university. You also need at least one year of experience as a journeyman electrician, or five years of experience that includes planning for, laying out, supervising, and installing wiring, apparatus, or equipment for electrical, heat, and power.  

Fire Alarm Installer: A licensed fire alarm installer may plan, lay out, and install electrical wiring, apparatus, and equipment for only those components of fire alarm systems that operate at 50 volts or less. License applicants need at least two years of experience in planning, laying out, and installing fire alarm systems.

APPLY FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR LICENSE: After fulfilling the work experience requirements, candidates may apply for a state electrical license through the Nebraska State Electrical Division. The application covers educational and work experience.

TAKE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR LICENSE EXAM: You can view the electrical exam schedule online. The exam topics include:

  • Basic Electricity Theory

  • National Electrical Code (NEC)

  • Nebraska State Electrical Act

  • Blueprint Reading

  • Emergency Circuits

  • Fire Alarm Circuits 

PROVIDE PROOF OF INSURANCE: To obtain an electrical contractor license at the state level, applicants must also provide proof of accident, property, and liability insurance. 

Types of Electrician Licenses in Nebraska

The state of Nebraska issues seven types of electrical contractor licenses: 

  • Class B Electrical Contractor

  • Electrical Contractor

  • Class B Journeyman Electrician

  • Journeyman Electrician

  • Residential Journeyman Electrician

  • Class A Master Electrician

  • Class B Master Electrician

Nebraska also issues state licenses for fire alarm installers and special electricians, who deal with irrigation systems and well pump wiring.

Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Electrician in Nebraska

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for electricians in Nebraska is expected to grow by 8% by 2029, much faster than average. The average electrician in the state of Nebraska earns $27.01 per hour, or $56,180 per year.

There are many benefits you’ll see from pursuing a Nebraska electrician license:

  • Most importantly, it is required by law in Nebraska to be licensed through the state to legally perform electrical work—outside of regular maintenance in one's own home.

  • A trade license provides proof of your experience and skill.

  • Only licensed electricians can: work independently as an electrical contractor, operate a business and advertise services, obtain commercial insurance and bonding, pull building permits, pass inspections, and bid on public or government projects.

  • Obtaining a license protects your company and your customers.

  • An electrician license gives you a competitive advantage in the job market.

  • It also increases your earning potential as an electrician.

How Much Does It Cost for Electrician Licensing in Nebraska?

The electrical contractor exam costs $125, while the other licensing exams cost $60. The cost of an electrician license in Nebraska varies, based on the level of licensing and whether the year is even or odd. 

The even-year prices are as follows:

  • Electrical Contractor: $125

  • Journeyman Electrician: $25

  • Residential Journeyman Electrician, Type RW: $25

  • Fire Alarm Installer: $25

  • Apprentice Registration: $20

The odd-year prices are as follows:

  • Electrical Contractor: $250

  • Journeyman Electrician: $50

  • Residential Journeyman Electrician, Type RW: $50

  • Fire Alarm Installer: $50

  • Apprentice Registration: $40

Nebraska electrical licenses expire at the end of even-numbered years. To renew licensure, licensees must complete 12 hours of continuing education. The Nebraska Electrical Division maintains a list of continuing education providers.

How Long Does It Take to Get an Electrician License in Nebraska? 

To apply for a journeyman license, you need at least four years of experience in the electrical industry. Most applicants gain this experience through an electrical apprenticeship. A two-year associate's degree in electrical technology counts as one year of experience. 

You can obtain an electrical contractor license with work experience, or with a combination of experience and education. You need five years of experience in the electrical industry or a four-year electrical degree at an accredited college, in addition to one or more years of experience as a journeyman electrician.

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Nebraska Electrician Training Programs and Schools

Many community colleges, trade schools, technical and vocational schools offer apprenticeship programs and the training you need to become an electrical professional in Nebraska. They're located all over the state, including in bigger cities and smaller communities.

Here are a few listed on the Nebraska Electrical Division list:

  • Lincoln Electrical JATC 1415 Old Farm Road Lincoln, NE 68512 402-423-4519

  • Southeast Community College 301 South 68th St. Place Jack J. Huck Continuing Education Center Lincoln, NE 68510 402-437-2508

  • Nebraska-Iowa Council 2840 S. 70th Street, Suite 7-272 Lincoln, NE 68506 402-483-4483

The Omaha Joint Electrical Apprenticeship and Training Company provides an opportunity to earn income and experience while learning the trade.

The top schools for an associate's degree in electrical technology are: Metropolitan Community College, Central Community College, and Western Nebraska Community College. Top universities for a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering are: University of Nebraska at Lincoln and the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Tuition: The cost of tuition depends on the program you choose, but can range from $2,500 to $8,500 a year. For more information on becoming an electrical contractor, visit Trades & Careers.

On-the-Job Experience: While on the job, you'll gain an understanding of electrical standards, as well as math and scientific principles. Electricians need keen eyesight and good hand-eye coordination, as well as proper time management skills. They also need to have good customer service skills, be able to work independently, have good physical endurance, and use logical problem-solving techniques. Electricians also learn how to read blueprints, circuit diagrams, and other technical documents.

Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Nebraska?

The Nebraska State Electrical Division issues electrical contractor licenses.

Does My Nebraska Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

Yes! Nebraska offers reciprocity for journeyman electricians with the states of Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Texas, and Wyoming. A Nebraska electrical contractor license also holds reciprocity in Minnesota and South Dakota.

The journey to becoming a licensed electrician in Nebraska may be easier for those previously licensed in Minnesota and South Dakota. Before applying for reciprocity with the Nebraska State Electrical Division, applicants must meet these requirements:

  • A score of 75% or higher on the state licensing exam.

  • 8,000 work hours performed in the state of Nebraska.

  • An electrical license from your origin state, held in good standing for at least one year.

National Electrician Certifications

While optional, national certifications can help you demonstrate your proficiency in certain aspects of the electrical trade to potential employers and clients, which often translates into more job opportunities and higher pay. 

These include the Independent Electrical Contractors Certified Professional Electrician (CPE) distinction, certification through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), among dozens of additional electrician certifications available.

Electrician Resources

You can stay up to date on all electrician industry news in several ways: