Discover your ROI with ServiceTitan: Calculate Now

Licensing Guides

Connecticut Electrical License: How to Become an Electrician in Connecticut

category-iconElectrical, CT

Table of Contents
  1. Licensing Requirements for Electricians in Connecticut

  2. Steps to Get an Electrician License in Connecticut

  3. Types of Electrical Licensure in Connecticut

  4. Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Electrician in Connecticut

  5. How Much Does It Cost for Electrician Licensing in Connecticut?

  6. How Long Does It Take to Get an Electrician License in Connecticut?

  7. Connecticut Electrician Training Programs and Schools

  8. Connecticut Electrician Licensing Exam Details

  9. Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Connecticut?

  10. Does My Connecticut Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

Being an electrician isn’t just a job, it’s a solid career path. Electrical contractors enjoy a wide range of employment opportunities and earn a respectable income. There’s also job security—customers will always need skilled trade professionals to install and service the electrical systems in their homes and businesses. 

The process of becoming an electrician takes time, but you get paid while you learn and gain experience!

» Want to grow your electrical business? Click here to get a demo.

Licensing Requirements for Electricians in Connecticut

Is a license required to be an electrician in Connecticut? Yes.

Connecticut requires electricians to be licensed and also makes very specific distinctions regarding what type of systems they can work on, including fire alarms, voltage regulations, etc. Connecticut offers 10 different types of electrician licenses, which are issued by the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection (DCP). Electrical apprentices must register with the Connecticut Department of Labor and pay a $50 fee. The licensed electrician who will be supervising the apprentice must pay a $60 fee at the time of the apprentice’s registration. 

Steps to Get an Electrician License in Connecticut

  1. Register as an electrical apprentice

  2. Obtain the necessary work experience, job training, and classroom instruction needed to become a journeyperson.

  3. Apply for and take the journeyman electrician examination.

  4. Consider becoming licensed as an independent electrical contractor.

OBTAIN THE NECESSARY WORK EXPERIENCE: To become an E-2 unlimited journeyperson, you must show 8,000 hours (four years) of hands-on work experience, as well as 144 hours per year of classroom instruction. These requirements can be met by attending a technical college and completing an apprenticeship under the supervision of a licensed contracting company, or by joining a union or non-union apprenticeship program. Connecticut has two main JATCs (Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committees): The Local Union 488 JATC in Monroe and the Local Union 90 JATC in Wallingford. A list of non-union apprenticeship programs is available on the Independent Electrical Contractors of New England database.

APPLY FOR AND TAKE THE JOURNEYPERSON EXAM: Once you have met the required hours to become a journeyperson, submit an application to take the state exam. A $90 application fee is required, as well as a $65 exam fee. The test is administered by PSI. You must also provide an apprenticeship completion letter from your employer, or a notarized statement proving 8,000 hours of electrical work experience, schooling, etc. You must register to take the journeyperson exam within 30 days of completing your apprenticeship. Once you pass the exam, your journeyperson license costs $120 and requires annual renewal. Continuing education credits are required for journeyman license renewal.

BECOME A LICENSED INDEPENDENT ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: There are several requirements to become a licensed electrical contractor in the state of Connecticut. First, you must obtain an E-2 journeyperson electrician license, or six years of documented experience. 

Next, you must pass the unlimited electrical contractor exam, as well as the business and law exam. There is a $150 application fee for a contractor’s license, as well as a $65 exam fee. 

Once you pass the exam, your electrical contractor license costs $150 and requires annual renewal. Continuing education credits are required for renewal.  

PROOF OF INSURANCE: Even if you are self-employed, electrical contractors in Connecticut must have worker’s compensation insurance.  

Types of Electrical Licensure in Connecticut

Connecticut offers 10 different electrician licenses, which are defined by the Connecticut Department of Labor website as follows:

C-5 LIMITED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: May perform only work limited to low voltage, alarm or signal work, audio and sound systems, and telephone-interconnect. The voltage of any system not to exceed 48 volts or eight amperes, where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: two years as a properly licensed journeyperson, or at least six years of equivalent experience and training.

C-6 LIMITED ELECTRICAL JOURNEYPERSON: May perform only work as defined for C-5 category, and only while employed by a licensed electrical contractor. The requirements to qualify for this license exam: completion of a registered apprenticeship program, or at least four years of equivalent experience and training.

E-1 UNLIMITED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: Permitted to do all electrical work as defined in section 20-330 of the Connecticut general statutes. The requirements to qualify for this license exam: two years as an unlimited licensed journeyperson, or at least six years of equivalent experience and training.

E-2 UNLIMITED ELECTRICAL JOURNEYPERSON: Permitted to do all electrical work as defined in section 20-330 of the Connecticut General Statutes, and only while employed by a properly licensed contractor. The requirement to qualify for this license exam: completion of a registered apprenticeship program, or at least four years of equivalent experience and training.

L-1 ELECTRICAL LINES CONTRACTOR: The holder of this license may perform only work limited to line construction, including distribution systems and their allied work, for public and private companies; installation, maintenance, and repair of all high-voltage cable splicing, and pulling wire for all systems in excess of 2,400 volts; traffic signal and highway lighting installation, maintenance, and repair. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: two years as a properly licensed journeyperson, or at least six years of equivalent experience and training.

L-2 ELECTRICAL LINES JOURNEYPERSON: The holder of this license may perform only work limited to line construction, including distribution systems and their allied work, for public and private companies; installation, maintenance, and repair of all high-voltage cable splicing, and pulling wire for all systems in excess of 2,400 volts; traffic signal and highway lighting installation, maintenance, and repair, and only while employed by a contractor licensed for such work. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: completion of a registered apprenticeship program, or at least four years of equivalent experience and training.

L-5 LIMITED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: The holder of this license may perform only work limited to low voltage, alarm or signal work, audio and sound systems. The installation or repair of any telecommunication work is not authorized with the exception of the interface wiring from an alarm system to an existing telephone connection for monitoring purposes. The voltage of the system not to exceed 25 volts or five amperes, where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: two years as a properly licensed journeyperson, or at least six years of equivalent experience and training.

L-6 LIMITED ELECTRICAL JOURNEYPERSON: The holder of this license may perform only work limited to low voltage, alarm, or signal work, audio and sound systems, and only while employed by a properly licensed contractor. The installation or repair of any telecommunication work is not authorized, with the exception of the interface wiring from an alarm system to an existing telephone connection for monitoring purposes. The voltage of the system not to exceed 25 volts or five amperes, where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: completion of a registered apprenticeship program, or at least four years of equivalent experience and training.

T-1 LIMITED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: The holder of this license may perform only work limited to telephone-interconnect systems, where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a properly licensed electrical contractor. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: hold a journeyperson license, or at least six years of equivalent experience and training.

T-2 LIMITED ELECTRICAL JOURNEYPERSON: The holder of this license may perform only work as defined for the T-1 category, and only while employed by a licensed electrical contractor. The requirements to qualify for this license examination: completion of a registered apprenticeship program, or at least four years of equivalent experience and training, or five years as a registered public service technician.

Benefits of Becoming a Licensed Electrician in Connecticut

Experts predict the number of electrician jobs in Connecticut will increase nearly 21% through 2022. Electricians in Connecticut earn an average of $34.55 per hour, or $71,864 per year.

There are many benefits you’ll see from pursuing Connecticut electrician licensing:

  • Most importantly, a state license is required by law in Connecticut to legally perform electrical work.

  • A trade license provides proof of your experience and skill.

  • Only licensed electricians can: operate a business and advertise services, obtain commercial insurance, pull building permits, and pass inspections, bid on public and government projects.

  • A license protects your company and customers.

  • It gives you a competitive advantage in the job market, and also increases your earning potential.

How Much Does It Cost for Electrician Licensing in Connecticut?

There are several costs associated with obtaining an electrician’s license in Connecticut, including application, exam, and licensing fees.  

Yearly tuition for an electrician career program in Connecticut costs $11,768 on average, in addition to $1,047 in books and supplies.

The #1 newsletter for the trades.

How Long Does It Take to Get an Electrician License in Connecticut?

Obtaining a journeyperson license in the state of Connecticut takes about four years, or 8,000 hours of work experience and 144 hours of classroom instruction. 

Connecticut Electrician Training Programs and Schools

Many community colleges, technical and vocational schools offer the training you need to become an electrical professional in Connecticut. They are located all over the state, in major cities such as Hartford and New Haven, as well as smaller communities.

The Connecticut Department of Labor suggests electricians-in-training study these topics: orientation and electrical safety, electrical installations, electrical boards, residential, commercial, industrial, and low-voltage wiring, maintenance and repair, tools, equipment and instruments, cable splicing installation, maintenance and repair, basic knowledge, and associate trades.  

Popular electrical schools in Connecticut include: Eli Whitney Technical High School in Hamden, the Porter and Chester Institute, which provides campuses in several cities, as well as the Industrial Management and Training Institute in Waterbury.

Program Prerequisites: Program prerequisites vary. Most programs, however, require you to be 18 years old, hold a high-school diploma or GED, possess a valid driver’s license, and show a passing Algebra grade.

On-the-Job Experience: While on the job, you will gain an understanding of electrical standards, as well as math and scientific principles. Electricians need keen eyesight and good hand-eye coordination, as well as proper time management skills. They also must demonstrate good customer service skills, be able to work independently, maintain good physical endurance, and use logical problem-solving techniques. Electricians also learn how to read blueprints, circuit diagrams, and other technical documents.

Connecticut Electrician Licensing Exam Details

The journeyperson exam features 80 questions that must be answered within 3.5 hours. A passing score is at least 70%. The open-book exam allows applicants to use the National Electrical Code (NEC) and Ugly’s Electrical Reference. Study guides and exam prep materials are available. 

Topics covered during the exam include:

  • General Electrical Knowledge

  • Service, Feeders, and Branch Circuits

  • Grounding and Bonding

  • Conductors and Cables

  • Raceways and Boxes

  • Special Occupancies and Equipment

  • Electrical Power

  • Motors

  • Low Voltage

  • Lighting

  • Illuminated Signs

  • Fire Detection and Alarm Systems

  • Safety Information

  • Overcurrent Protection

  • High Voltage

  • Photovoltaics (solar power)

The electrical contractor’s exam features the same topics as the journeyperson exam, but there are 100 questions to answer within four hours. The exam is open book and applicants can use the National Electrical Code (NEC) and Ugly’s Electrical Reference. You must get at least a 70% for a passing score.

The business and law exam contains 50 questions to answer within two hours. The open-book exam lets applicants use the Contractor’s Guide to Business, Law, and Project Management. A passing score equals at least 70%. 

Topics covered on the exam are as follows:

  • Licensing

  • Estimating and Bidding

  • Lien Law

  • Financial Management

  • Tax Laws

  • Labor Laws

  • Project Management

  • Contracts

  • Business Organization

  • Risk Management

  • Environmental and Safety

Who Issues Electrician Licenses in Connecticut?

The Connecticut State Department of Consumer Protection.

Does My Connecticut Electrical License Work in Any Other State?

No. Connecticut does not maintain any reciprocity agreements with other states.

National Electrician Certifications

While optional, national certifications can help you demonstrate your proficiency in certain aspects of the electrical trade to potential employers and clients, which often translates into more job opportunities and higher pay.

These include the Independent Electrical Contractors Certified Professional Electrician (CPE) distinction, certification through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), among dozens of additional electrician certifications available

Electrician Resources

You can stay up to date on all electrician industry news in several ways:

Explore Toolbox