Discover your ROI with ServiceTitan: Calculate Now

Licensing Guides

HVAC License Texas: How to Become an HVAC Contractor in Texas

category-iconHVAC, TX

Table of Contents
  1. Licensing Requirements for HVAC in Texas

  2. Steps to Get an HVAC License in Texas

  3. Types of HVAC Licenses in Texas

  4. Benefits of Getting an HVAC License in Texas

  5. What Is the Median Salary for an HVAC Technician in Texas?

  6. How Much Does It Cost to Get an HVAC License in Texas?

  7. How Long Does it Take to Get an HVAC Contractors License in Texas?

  8. Texas HVAC Training Programs and Schools

  9. Texas HVAC Licensing Exam Details

  10. Who Issues HVAC Licenses in Texas?

  11. Does My Texas HVAC License Work in Any Other State?

  12. HVAC Specific Requirements: EPA Certification

  13. Other Requirements Unique to Texas

Being an HVAC contractor isn’t just a job, it’s a solid career path. HVAC professionals have a wide range of employment opportunities and they are well compensated. There’s also job security—there will always be a need for skilled professionals to install and maintain heating and cooling systems in our homes and businesses. The process of learning the trade takes time, but you get paid while you learn!

» Want to grow your HVAC business? Click here to get a demo.

Licensing Requirements for HVAC in Texas

Is a license required for HVAC Contractors in Texas? Yes.

To perform heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration work in the state of Texas, you must be a licensed contractor—or a registered or certified technician working under a licensed contractor.

Steps to Get an HVAC License in Texas

  1. You must be at least 18 years of age

  2. Register with the state as a technician working for a contractor 

  3. Get work experience under the supervision of a licensed contractor

  4. Get certification (optional or additional work experience)

  5. Apply for license

  6. Take ACR contractor exam

REGISTER WITH STATE: The Texas Dept. of Licensing & Regulation requires anyone working under a licensed contractor in Texas as an A/C and Refrigeration technician to register with the state by submitting an online application and pay a $20 registration fee.

GET CERTIFICATION: After working on a jobsite for 24 months under a licensed contractor's supervision, Texas HVAC techs can opt to become a Certified ACR Technician by completing a 2,000-hour certification program and paying a $50 application fee. Many institutions offer Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Certification Training Programs however, individuals seeking to obtain a Certified Technician License this way should verify it is approved by TDLR before enrolling in a program.

OR COMPLETE ADDITIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE: Those individuals not interested in becoming a Certified ACR Technician must complete 48 months of jobsite experience under the supervision of a licensed contractor before applying for their own contractor’s license.

APPLY FOR LICENSE: Once you’ve fulfilled the work experience requirements, HVAC technicians may apply for a Texas ACR Contractor License. You must be at least 18 years old to apply.

TAKE LICENSING EXAM: The license class and endorsements you choose will determine the type of work you can perform, the licensing exam that you will take, and the insurance coverage that you must maintain.

PROVIDE PROOF OF INSURANCE: Must maintain commercial general liability insurance while your license is active, and submit a Certificate of Insurance once you pass the licensing exam. The minimum insurance coverage required is based on the license Class A or B. 

*If applying for both Class A and Class B license, you will receive a single document with two license numbers. Both licenses must have the same business affiliation and addresses.

Types of HVAC Licenses in Texas

What are the different types of HVAC licenses in Texas?

  • There are two types of HVAC contractor licenses in Texas. A Class A contractor license allows you to work on any size unit. A Class B contractor license allows you to work on cooling systems of no more than 25 tons and heating systems of 1.5 million BTUs/hour or less.

  • Before being allowed to earn your contractor’s license, you must first be a registered technician working under a licensed contractor.

  • From there you can decide to become a Certified Technician. That’s a voluntary qualification that exceeds the standards of a Registered Technician.

  • Before applying for a technician certification, you must meet either the practical experience or training requirement. Applicants may become qualified for technician certification by completing a department-approved certification program consisting of 2,000 hours of combined instruction and practical experience.

ENDORSEMENTS: There are three endorsements available to add to an Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Contractor License. Each license may have only one endorsement.

1. Environmental Air Conditioning: Includes treating air to control temperature, humidity, cleanliness, ventilation, and circulation to meet human comfort requirements.

2. Commercial Refrigeration: Includes the use of mechanical or absorption equipment to control temperature or humidity to satisfy the intended use of a specific space. Limited to coolers, freezers, ice machines, and equipment that provides temperature and humidity controls.

3. Process Cooling or Heating: Includes controlling temperature, humidity, or cleanliness solely for production requirements or the proper operation of equipment. Limited to coolers, freezers, ice machines, and equipment that provides temperature and humidity controls.

Benefits of Getting an HVAC License in Texas

There are many benefits you’ll see from getting your Texas HVAC license:

  • Most importantly, it is required by law in Texas to be registered, certified or licensed through the state to legally perform A/C and Refrigeration work.

  • A trade license is proof of your experience and skill.

  • Only licensed ACR contractors can: operate a business and advertise services, obtain commercial insurance, pull building permits and pass inspections, bid on public and government projects.

  • Having a license protects your company and customers.

  • A license gives you a competitive advantage in the job market.

  • It also increases your earning potential.

What Is the Median Salary for an HVAC Technician in Texas?

The salary for an HVAC Technician in Texas is on the low side compared to the national average, but the cost of living is also lower in many parts of the state. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the annual mean wage for HVAC mechanics and installers nationally as $51,420 and in Texas as $46,840. According to indeed.com, the average salaries for HVAC professionals in Texas increase with experience and training and are as follows:

  • HVAC Mechanic: The average salary for an HVAC Mechanic is $23.46 per hour in Texas and $8,750 overtime per year.

  • HVAC Installer: The average salary for an HVAC installer is $20.21 per hour in Texas and $5,813 overtime per year.

  • HVAC Technician: The average salary for an HVAC Technician is $22.57 per hour in Texas and $6,375 overtime per year.

  • HVAC Supervisor: The average base salary for an HVAC Supervisor is $76,047 per year in Texas and $11,250 overtime per year.

The median income for an HVAC Contractor in Texas is $41,834 according to salary.com as of November 25, 2020, but the range typically falls between $35,515 and $53,186. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on the city and many other important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

How Much Does It Cost to Get an HVAC License in Texas?

The cost of an air conditioning and refrigeration license in Texas is $115.

Anyone working under a licensed contractor in Texas as an A/C and Refrigeration technician must register with the state by submitting an online application and pay a $20 fee.

After gaining 24 months of jobsite experience under a licensed contractor's supervision, Texas HVAC techs can opt to become a Certified ACR Technician by completing a department-approved 2,000-hour certification program and paying the $50 application fee.

How to Get an HVAC License in Texas

  • WORK EXPERIENCE: Work at least 48 months under a licensed ACR Contractor supervision in the past 72 months, OR Hold Texas ACR Technician Certification for past 12 months and with at least 36 months practical experience under licensed ACR Contractor supervision in the past 48 months

  • SUBMIT WORK EXPERIENCE DOCUMENTATION: Submit completed Experience Verification Form. Do not complete this form yourself. The experience verification form must be completed by the licensed air conditioning and refrigeration contractor who supervised your experience.

  • TAKE THE EXAM: After submitting your application and proof of qualifications, the Texas Department of Licensing & Regulation will approve your eligibility to take the licensing exam.

  • PROOF OF INSURANCE: You must submit proof of insurance by providing a Certificate of Insurance verifying a commercial general liability policy.

  • CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK: You must pass a criminal history check by providing a Criminal History Questionnaire if you’ve ever been convicted or pleaded guilty to a criminal offense. All license applicants are subject to a criminal background check.

How Long Does it Take to Get an HVAC Contractors License in Texas?

It will take a minimum of four years to qualify to take your ACR Exam in Texas. However, you can be working as a registered technician under a licensed contractor — and earning money — the whole time.

The #1 newsletter for the trades.

Texas HVAC Training Programs and Schools

There are many programs to get the training you need to become an HVAC professional in Texas and they are located all over the state, in major cities and smaller communities.

  • Lincoln College of Technology in Grand Prairie, Texas, is on that list. Houston Trade Training LLC and Southern Careers Institute Corpus Christi also get good reviews.

Tuition: The Cost of Tuition depends on the program you choose but can range from $1,200 - $15,000 at a technical school or pursuing an associate’s degree at a community college.

Program Prerequisites: You must be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma or a GED.

On-the-Job Experience: While on the job, you will need to have good customer service skills, be detail-oriented, have some mechanical capability, and be physically fit because the job can include some heavy lifting and hours of walking, standing, and working in tight spaces.

Texas HVAC Licensing Exam Details

According to The Training Center of Air Conditioning and Heating, an HVAC school in Houston, you can expect the test for a Class A License to consist of 120 questions and have a time limit of four hours. For a Class B license exam, you’ll have three hours to answer 100 questions. You must score at least 70% to pass either exam. Each will have specialized questions, but the same general topics will include:

  • Boiler systems

  • Business and Law

  • HVAC systems

  • Heating and cooling

  • Ventilation

  • Equipment requirements

  • Refrigeration systems and principles

  • Pressure relief

Who Issues HVAC Licenses in Texas?

The Texas Dept. of Licensing & Regulation issues and renews all HVAC contractor licenses in the state.

Does My Texas HVAC License Work in Any Other State?

Yes! There are reciprocity agreements with South Carolina and Georgia.

HVAC Specific Requirements: EPA Certification

Everywhere throughout the country, including Texas, federal-level EPA 608 HVAC Certification (to handle refrigerants) (Environmental Protection Agency) is required for any professional who conducts refrigerant line-pressure tests or handles or adds refrigerant to existing AC systems. 

Most training programs can direct you to how and where to get that certification, or your employer will require you to get it before handling refrigerant. You can also go to EPA.gov and key in 608 Certification in the search bar to find out which institutions in your state offer certification programs. 

Take Certification Exam: You must acquire your EPA Certification from an approved organization. A list of these organizations can be found on the EPA’s website. There are four types of EPA Certifications for Refrigerant. They allow for different levels of certification for different scopes of work.

  • Type I – for servicing small appliances containing five pounds of refrigerant or less.

  • Type II – for servicing high-pressure units that contain five pounds or more of refrigerant (including most small commercial and residential systems).

  • Type III – for servicing or disposing of low-pressure appliances.

  • Universal – for servicing all systems and appliances covered under Types I, II, and III. Generally more useful than targeting any one specific certification.

Core Exam

For all certifications, you must pass the “Core Section” of the EPA certification exam. It covers the following topics:

  • Ozone depletion

  • Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol

  • Section 608 regulations

  • Substitute refrigerants and oils

  • Refrigeration

  • The Three R’s (Recover, Recycle, Reclaim)

  • Recovery techniques

  • Dehydration evacuation

  • Safety

  • Shipping

National HVAC Certifications

Other certifications can help you demonstrate your proficiency to potential employers and clients. North American Technical Excellence (NATE) certification, ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers) certification, and other professional certifications are not required but can add to your marketability as a service provider and therefore increase your opportunity to make more money.

Other Requirements Unique to Texas

To keep your state-issued license current, Texas requires you to complete eight hours of continuing education, including one hour of instruction. This continuing education must be completed before your license expires. For late renewal (if eligible), educational courses must be completed within one year immediately prior to the date of renewal.

Resources

You can stay up to date on all HVAC industry news in several ways:

Explore Toolbox